Ashurbanipal and the Assyrians at the British Museum, London

I'm lucky enough to be a regular visitor to the British Museum, and on a recent trip was excited to be able to see the latest exhibition, 'I am Ashurbanipal: king of the world, king of Assryia', which explores the life and world of Assyria's last great king who reigned in the seventh century BC, … Continue reading Ashurbanipal and the Assyrians at the British Museum, London

In the land of the Prince Bishops: the city of Durham, England

The city of Durham is one of my favourite places. The medieval castle and cathedral, a UNESCO World Heritage Site standing high up on a wooded peninsula above a bend in the River Wear, and the steep, winding streets below form an historic centre the equal of anywhere in Europe. Bill Bryson, in his Notes … Continue reading In the land of the Prince Bishops: the city of Durham, England

Winter dreaming: the Greco-Roman theatre at Taormina, Sicily

On days that I work from home I'll always start with a walk. Nothing special at all, just a way to get some fresh air and a little exercise before turning on the laptop. Today, leaving the house I looked at the sky and was confronted with a quintessential January day in southern England: it … Continue reading Winter dreaming: the Greco-Roman theatre at Taormina, Sicily

Public art and retelling a city story: St Kyneburgh’s Well, Southgate Street, Gloucester

Just above the docks of Gloucester at the end of Southgate Street where one of the old Roman gates into the city once stood, there's now an open space known as Kimbrose Triangle. Within this space is a large two-part installation in steel by the artist Tom Price, one a hollow tower standing to about … Continue reading Public art and retelling a city story: St Kyneburgh’s Well, Southgate Street, Gloucester

Here be monsters: The Museum of Natural History, Oxford

We had a family day out to Oxford last week, to see the Ashmolean Museum's Spellbound exhibition – an evocative, surprising and dark exploration of folk magic and ritual from medieval to modern times – and to go to the Museum of Natural History where a new display has been installed. Photography wasn't allowed at … Continue reading Here be monsters: The Museum of Natural History, Oxford